St Edward, New John Street

Demolished

Opened as a mission church in a former Presbyterian church, St Edward's served a population largely housed in back-to-backs set amongst industry. Damaged by bombing in World War 2, it never reopened. 

 

The church is shown as the Scotch Chapel on this 1866 map.
The church is shown as the Scotch Chapel on this 1866 map.

Originally built as a Presbyterian church about 1853, the building was bought for the church of England in 1896 as a mission of St. Stephen's on Newtown Row and consecrated two years later with a parish assigned out of St Stephen's, and St. Matthias'. It was a simple brick building with an apsidal chancel, nave, vestries and porch and stood back on the north side of New John Street West between Hospital Street and Summer Lane completely surrounded by half a dozen metal works and courts of back-to-backs. 

 

The church was set back from the street and a Sunday School was built in front of it, probably while it was still a Presbyterian church. Alongside it was what later became the Rectory.  

St Edward's Sunday School 1950s: the church stood  behind a courtyard behind this building. The building on the left was the rectory. Image posted by Astoness on Birmingham History Forum
St Edward's Sunday School 1950s: the church stood behind a courtyard behind this building. The building on the left was the rectory. Image posted by Astoness on Birmingham History Forum

The church was hit by a German bomb during the Second World War, although the ruined building remained into the 1950s.

 

When St George's Hockley was demolished in 1960, buildings here were reused at St George's. That church was rebuilt in 1972 on a new site on Bridge Street West.

 

The benefice was united with that of St Nicolas, Lower Tower Street in 1942 to form the united benefice of St Nicolas & St Edward and in 1949 that parish was merged with that of St George's, Hockley.  

 

William Dargue 16.05.2016